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PSHRE Curriculum

The Mosslands School

Department of Personal, Social, Health & Economic Education

British Values – Statement of Intent

Within the PSHE curriculum we address British Values in a spiral model with content being examined with cultural sensitivity in an age appropriate manner linking to other issues studied.

To understand the importance of ‘British values’ in establishing community cohesion
 

Key questions raised are:

● What are ‘British values’?

● How are ‘British values’ demonstrated by; individuals / leaders / the community?

● Why might some people reject the concept of ‘British values’?

● How might some people misuse the concept of ‘British values’ to manipulate or persuade others?

● Should we promote ‘British values’ in our community? How could this be achieved?

Through the curriculum students will be able to:

● explain the terms democracy, tolerance, and community cohesion;

● suggest examples of how ‘British values’ are practised in their community;

● evaluate the effect of ‘British values’ on themselves and their community;

● describe the value in feeling part of a strong community and the benefits of neighbourly behaviour;

● describe how actions contribute to a sense of community;

● identify the skills and character attributes that help people to successfully live and work together;

● evaluate the concept of ‘British values’, including how the term itself may be alienating or how some values may be unfamiliar for some people arriving in the UK;

● explore the impact of core values, recognising how they can unite or divide groups;

● explain why individuals may prioritise different values over others;

● suggest ways that they can promote ‘British values’.  

● evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of living in a diverse society;

● explain how prejudice of all kinds can lead to discrimination;

● analyse their own feelings about people who are different from them;

● evaluate the ways in which we can challenge and prevent discrimination and offensive behaviour as a society; 

● evaluate ways in which they might challenge discrimination and offensive behaviour as individuals;

● understand how members of the same family and the same community can hold conflicting values; 

● analyse different ways in which individuals and communities might respond to this;

● assess and debate moral issues effectively, assertively expressing disagreement;

● demonstrate methods for managing conflicting views with those they care about.

To explore feelings about diversity, discrimination and conflicting values and to develop strategies for challenging all forms of offensive behaviour. 

Key questions raised are:

● What does it mean to live in a diverse society?

● What are the advantages and disadvantages of this?

● How does prejudice lead to discrimination?

● How can we prevent discrimination and offensive behaviour in our society?

● Why might people hold conflicting values (even if they are from the same family / community)?

● How might people respond to holding different values from those close to them?

● How can we manage conflict about our values?

Through the curriculum students will be able to:

● evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of living in a diverse society;

● explain how prejudice of all kinds can lead to discrimination;

● analyse their own feelings about people who are different from them;

● evaluate the ways in which we can challenge and prevent discrimination and offensive behaviour as a society; 

● evaluate ways in which they might challenge discrimination and offensive behaviour as individuals;

● understand how members of the same family and the same community can hold conflicting values; 

● analyse different ways in which individuals and communities might respond to this;

● assess and debate moral issues effectively, assertively expressing disagreement;

● demonstrate methods for managing conflicting views with those they care about.

To understand the nature of extremism.

Key questions raised are:

● What is extremism / radicalisation?

● What types of extremist groups exist?

● Why might someone want to join an extremist group?

● What are the risks for someone who becomes involved with extremism?

● What are the effects of extremism on the community?

● What techniques do extremist groups use to recruit new members?

● How do extremist groups operate online?

● How can someone resist radicalisation techniques?

● What should someone do if they are concerned about themselves or a friend?

Through the curriculum students will be able to:

● define the terms extremism and radicalisation;

● challenge assumptions about extremism;

● understand that there are a range of extremist groups from different walks of life;

● suggest reasons why (young) people may join extremist groups;

● explain the risks for an individual of being associated with an extremist group;

● explain the threat to the community posed by extremist groups;

● recognise how extremist groups operate on social media;

● understand the techniques used by extremist groups to manipulate and persuade;

● describe and demonstrate ways to resist these techniques;

● explain what someone could do if they were worried about themselves or a friend.

The tables below highlight where values are explicitly taught within the Personal, Social, Health & Economic Programme & KS4 RE. Other subjects such as RE (KS3), Geography and History will also have explicit elements and all subjects and activities in school will reflect these values.

Key Stage 3 Curriculum
 

Year 7

Term

Content

Additional Activities

Autumn 1

Mental Health

Transition

Puberty

Kooth

Road Safety

Bikeability

University Visit

Autumn 2

Cancer Awareness

Drugs

Peer Pressure & Dealing with Bullying

Spring 1

Skills to Resist Radicalisation

Spring 2

Making Ethical Financial Decisions

Spending, Saving and Budgeting

 

Summer 1

Enterprise Skills and Employability

Challenging Stereotypes and Raising Aspirations

Keeping Safe - FGM

Summer 2

Self Esteem, Romance and Friendships

Year 8

Term

Content

Additional Activities

Autumn 1

Mental Health, Emotional Wellbeing and Body Image

Risk and Consequences, making financial decisions, Gambling

 

Autumn 2

Tackling Racism and Religious Discrimination. Protecting Human Rights

Spring 1

First Aid and Personal Safety – Road Safety

Spring 2

Alcohol and Drug Misuse and Managing Peer Influence

Summer 1

Introduction to Contraception

Introduction to Sexuality and Consent

The Risk of STIs

Summer 2

Careers Education

Year 9

Term

Content

Additional Activities

Autumn 1

Mental Health Awareness

Peer Pressure, Assertiveness and Risk (Knife and Gang Crime)

Diversity Role Models

Brook

University Visit

 

Access All Areas – Liverpool John Moores University*

 

 

*Selection Criteria

Autumn 2

Assessing the Risks of Drug and Alcohol Abuse and Addiction

Enterprise Skills and Employability

Spring 1

Challenging Homophobia, Transphobia and Sexism

Rights and Responsibilities in the Community – Tackling Age and Disability Discrimination

Key Stage 4 Curriculum 

Year 10

Term

Content

Additional Activities

Autumn 1

Mental Health and Ill Health – Challenging Stigma

Understanding the Causes and Effects of Debt

Young Health and Life Sciences Scheme – University of Liverpool*

 

Access All Areas – Liverpool John Moores University*

 

Elevate Transition Project*

 

Diversity Role Models (2021)

 

 

*Selection Criteria

 

 

Autumn 2

RE – Poverty and It’s Sources (Exploitation of the Poor)

RE – Giving Money to the Poor  

RE – Attitude to Wealth (Gambling and Loans)

Understanding the Risks Associated With Gambling

Spring 1

Evaluating the Social and Emotional Risks of Drug Taking

Managing Change, Grief and Bereavement

Spring 2

Relationships and Families

Summer 1

Challenging Extremism and Radicalisation

Matters of Life and Death

Summer 2

Challenging Relationships and Myths

Personal Safety – Running Lines, County Lines

Year 11

Term

Content

Additional Activities

Autumn 1

Mental Health and Healthy Coping Strategies

Learning and Revision Skills – Planning Year 11

 

Human Rights

Independent Advice and Guidance - Careers Interview

 

Mock Interviews

 

National Citizenship Service (NCS)

 

Access All Areas*

 

*Selection Criteria

 

Autumn 2

Understanding College Applications and Plans Beyond School

CV Preparation and Mock Interviews (Employability)

Spring 1

British Values, Human Rights and Community Cohesion

Spring 2

Preparation for Work – Rights and Responsibilities at Work

Health and Safety in Independent Contexts – Road, Passenger and Driver Safety